How to Create Good Feng Shui in Your Home

featured on The Spruce

image credit: Oscar Wong/Getty Images via  The Spruce

image credit: Oscar Wong/Getty Images via The Spruce

Creating Good Feng Shui

It can be overwhelming trying to figure out where to start when it comes to cultivating good feng shui in your home. What rooms should you begin with? How do you start fresh or what do you do if a room is already decorated? Thankfully, it doesn't need to be challenging. We've compiled a few ideas that will kickstart your journey to a happier and healthier home. So whether you’re new to feng shui or an expert, here are nine essential steps to create good feng shui in your home.

Brighten Up Your Entry

In feng shui, your entry represents how energy enters your home and your life. We say the front door is the “mouth of qi.” Naturally, the entry is first place to start when you want to create good feng shui in your home.

Start with decluttering and removing any debris. A lot of objects tend to accumulate at the front door. I'm not saying it needs to be completely empty, but rather uncluttered. Make it work for you.

Next, sweep and clean up the area. The front entry (interior and exterior) is often overlooked. Wipe down the door and shake out the door mat. Take a good look around.

…read full article

by Anjie Cho


If you’d like to learn more about feng shui check out the Mindful Design Feng Shui certification program. Laura Morris and I launched our program in September 2018. To get on the list about it, sign up at: www.mindfuldesignschool.com.

Dive deeper into feng shui to transform your life!

Mindful Design is a new way to learn feng shui. Create sacred spaces that support, and nourish.

Visit us at mindfuldesignschool.com

Q&A Sunday: Schools of Feng Shui

Schools of Feng Shui - Blue.jpg

There are so many schools of feng shui, I'm honestly a little confused. I just recently just found out that when sleeping, it is the crown of our head that faces our favourable direction. My mother had a seasoned practitioner come over a long time ago (almost 15 years ago, I think) and he told us the complete opposite! So technically we've been facing the wrong direction for almost 15 years! 

Samantha C., Malaysia

Thanks Samantha for this follow up comment. I believe that this is a great topic for Q&A Sunday!

Yes, there are dozens of feng shui schools out there, and not only is it confusing, they may contradict each other! The compass school looks at directions, the form school looks at shapes, plus there’s flying stars and many more. I practice BTB feng shui.

In BTB feng shui, we recognize all other schools of feng shui as correct and valid. One major difference with BTB is that we look at the direction of qi into a space, so the bagua is located based on the flow of energy. We also utilize many “invisible” cures in addition to mundane enhancements such as adding a crystal or moving furniture. The invisible cures are sometimes found in BTB books, but most often only shared by practitioners. Invisible cures may be rituals, meditations, etc. – which are effective ways to further boost your physical adjustments with powerful intention. An example would be “One good deed a day.” Personally, I share the “transcendental” adjustments one-on-one only.

In regards to your sleeping direction, I would encourage you to consider, rather than feeling that you have been facing the “wrong” direction, we can shift that viewpoint. Maybe this change of direction in bed symbolizes a shift in your life. Perhaps you are embracing another way of positioning yourself in the world and you’re excited to see the qi that’s opening up in your life.

It's interesting, because I’ve been reading a little into Vastu (Vedic feng shui), and they also use the commanding position for the bed. Yes, the different feng shui schools may contradict each other and be very confusing. In feng shui implementation, I suggest you use an advanced practitioner or do your best to follow one school.

by Anjie Cho


Mindful Design is a new way to learn feng shui. Our a unique training program takes an holistic approach to learning the art of feng shui design. Mindful design is about becoming aware, and attentive, to the energy around you: both inner and outer qi. It is about promoting a better way of living and creating sacred spaces that support, and nourish. Visit us at mindfuldesignschool.com.


Thanks for reading our "Q&A Sunday".  We will be answering questions submitted by our readers. Click here to submit any Feng Shui or Green Design questions!

How To Use Feng Shui To Create A Peaceful & Intentional Home

image credit:  The Good Trade

image credit: The Good Trade

How We Feel In A Space Matters

We all know the feeling of walking into a room and our senses heightening in a way that’s energizing, inspired, or calm. We also know the feeling of walking into a room and feeling uncomfortable or unsettled. These reactions to the spaces around us are part of the ancient Chinese practice of feng shui. Though the studies are highly complex and date back 6,000 years, how we feel in a space is feng shui in its most stripped-down form.

The word feng means "wind" and the word shui means "water." In Chinese culture, wind and water are symbols of good health, and thus, good fortune. When you incorporate the methods of feng shui into a space, you are essentially setting goals for what you want to bring into your life. Conversely, this Chinese practice suggests that when we have bad luck or misfortune in life, we may be living in a space with bad feng shui.

Feng shui is also rooted in the Chinese philosophy of yin & yang energies. The theory of yin & yang is that everything in our existence is composed of two opposing forces; neither can live without the other. These forces include light and dark, feminine and masculine, and hard and soft, to name a few. In feng shui, this concept is displayed in how we must balance the chaos around us to create peace in our lives. It is a fascinating idea that—as humans—we are forever moving through our existence with two opposing, yet interconnected, forces.

…read full article


If you’d like to learn more about feng shui check out the Mindful Design Feng Shui certification program. Laura Morris and I launched our program in September 2018. To get on the list about it, sign up at: www.mindfuldesignschool.com.

Dive deeper into feng shui to transform your life!

Mindful Design is a new way to learn feng shui. Create sacred spaces that support, and nourish.

Visit us at mindfuldesignschool.com

Q&A Sunday: Feng Shui in a Small Home

I am living in a very small house with a combination of toilet and shower (too small) on the ground floor. We have the intention to create a proper bathroom (no toilet) on the first floor, but the only room where that's possible is in the wealth & prosperity area of the bagua. As far as I know, this is not the best place because of the downward flow of energy. At the same time, we want to make an extension to create workspace, but this is only possible in front of the front door line. I have a lot of doubts and even consider whether it is better to move.

Corina van T., Holland

Hello to Holland! 

Thank you for your email, and thanks for reading my newsletter!

For clarification, in your small house, you currently have a small bathroom with toilet and shower only on the ground floor. You would like to create a bathroom on the upper floor with a bathtub and sink, but no toilet. However you are concerned because this area is in the wealth/abundance area of your home.

I have a couple of thoughts and comments. First, laying the bagua on upper floors is sometimes challenging. You would determine the layout based on what direction you are facing and where you are located as you make your final step onto the floor in question. So, I would ask you to double check the bagua layout. It’s a little challenging and usually something that an advanced feng shui practioner should advise you on. But if the bathroom must be in the abundance area, or you’re not able to layout the bagua confidently, it is what it is! I suggest balancing the energy with plants. The thought with bathrooms is that there is a lot of water flowing out, which symbolizes loss of cash flow and wealth. By adding plants, you can use this downward qi flow and feed the plants so there’s an upward positive growth.

Your second question is in regards to a work space or office in front of the front door (or “kan line”), which places it outside of the bagua. My teachers have taught that an extension of workspace in front of the kan line (front door line) is fine. In fact, it might be beneficial in two ways. First, you are extending the “gua,” whether the gua is Knowledge, Path in Life/Career, or Benefactors/Helpful people. The extension improves and expands your work in light of the gua it’s in. Second, the office outside the front door can mean you’re out in the world more, and can receive support in this way for your career.

Finally, whether to move or not, well that's up to you. I don’t know exactly how challenging it is there, functionally and feng shui wise, but in BTB feng shui we try to make suggestions so you don't have to move, which can be difficult and disruptive. However, if moving seems like the best positive thing for you, it should be considered. My intuition tells me that the issues that you asked about are able to be worked with :)

by Anjie Cho


Mindful Design is a new way to learn feng shui. Our a unique training program takes an holistic approach to learning the art of feng shui design. Mindful design is about becoming aware, and attentive, to the energy around you: both inner and outer qi. It is about promoting a better way of living and creating sacred spaces that support, and nourish. Visit us at mindfuldesignschool.com.


Thanks for reading our "Q&A Sunday".  We will be answering questions submitted by our readers. Click here to submit any Feng Shui or Green Design questions!

5 Feng Shui Tricks That'll Make A Small Space Feel Way Bigger

featured on MindBodyGreen by Emma Loewe

image credit: MaaHoo Studio / Stocksy via  MindBodyGreen

image credit: MaaHoo Studio / Stocksy via MindBodyGreen

Feng shui is an approach to home design that prioritizes the unseen as much as the seen. It's a collection of practices thought to help positive energy to settle in a space, and it's one we reference a lot here at mindbodygreen (ahem, we even offer a whole class on it).

Before your feng shui touch-up can begin, it's worth asking what you're hoping to create at home. Blame it on New York real estate, but when mbg's editors were tasked with thinking about what they could use more of, "space" was high on the list. If you, too, are eternally short on square footage, we compiled some of the top ways to use feng shui to help your home feel more expansive:

2. Opt for light, neutral colors.

This is a practical design tip that feng shui vouches for too. Lighter colors tend to open up a space while harsher tones like red, blues, and browns make things feel more cramped. "Having a very cohesive, monochromatic space is calming because there's not a lot of contrast, and it looks more expansive," says NYC-based architect and feng shui expert Anjie Cho.

…read full article


If you’d like to learn more about feng shui check out the Mindful Design Feng Shui certification program. Laura Morris and I launched our program in September 2018. To get on the list about it, sign up at: www.mindfuldesignschool.com.

Dive deeper into feng shui to transform your life!

Mindful Design is a new way to learn feng shui. Create sacred spaces that support, and nourish.

Visit us at mindfuldesignschool.com