3 Houseplants to Help You Feng Shui Your Home

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Photo credit: Shutterstock via inhabitat.com

Photo credit: Shutterstock via inhabitat.com

Hurrah! Spring is here! In feng shui philosophy, the spring season symbolizes new beginnings, growth, and expansion—like when the trees start to grow back their leaves. We use plants, the colors green and blue, as well as columnar and expansive shapes in feng shui to symbolize this type of energy. But in addition to making indoor spaces more attractive, did you know that houseplants also improve indoor air quality? Many houseplants remove harmful pollutants from the air that off gas from synthetic materials found in our buildings, furniture, and even clothing. These toxins can lead to poor health and low productivity. Adding plants to a space can also help create a softer and more vibrant energy, and they can heal us visually and physically—their natural green tones are relaxing and therapeutic. Now that the new season has sprung, infuse some positive energy into your home and adopt a houseplant this spring. Below are the three houseplants commonly used in feng shui adjustments.

Lucky Bamboo

Bamboo is a plant that is abundant in Asia and grows very quickly. It represents upright and honest growth, as well as flexibility and adaptability. Since the bamboo plant does not flower or fruit, it’s lifespan is long and simple. And because it is hollow, bamboo also symbolizes an empty heart of humbleness. I love the fact that in western culture, lucky bamboo has also become a symbol for the green sustainability movement. Lucky bamboo is not technically bamboo, but it looks very similar, is super easy to take care of, and represents the same thing symbolically.

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by Anjie Cho


3 Ways to Freshen Up Your Space for the Lunar New Year Using Feng Shui

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Photo credit: Shutterstock via inhabitat.com

Photo credit: Shutterstock via inhabitat.com

The Lunar New Year, fondly known as Chinese New Year, falls on Friday, Jan 31st in 2014. The year of the water snake will come to a close and the year of the wood horse will begin. According to the lunar calendar, this occasion marks the beginning of spring. Similar to the solar new year, it is a time to celebrate new beginnings and starting fresh. In feng shui tradition, we don’t look backwards so much as forwards. How can we welcome the best energy at this time?  The best way to do this is to do a little new year space clearing. Here I’ll share with you three steps to clear your space and make room for some positive chi!

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by Anjie Cho


Feng Shui 101: Getting Started with the Basics

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Photo credit: Shutterstock via inhabitat.com

Photo credit: Shutterstock via inhabitat.com

Feng shui is an ancient Asian art of placement developed thousands of years ago. Feng shui seeks to enhance and improve the flow of energy through your environment, to maximize the positive potential for your life. It is a truly holistic way to look at your environment. It may include interior or architectural design, but it’s really more than that. Feng shui looks beyond the superficial and is about creating awareness beyond what you see on the surface. The intent is to create an environment that supports and nurtures you.

As a holistic interior architect, many people share with me the wish to integrate feng shui into their homes and businesses, but they want to wait until the space is clean, or they have more time, or when they move. These are of course appropriate times to renovate or redecorate, but what most people don’t know is that you can incorporate feng shui at any time. It may even be more helpful when it comes at a challenging time. Feng shui is more than just about moving furniture around, it’s about shifting your environment physically and energetically to support and nurture your life. Even if you are not ready to renovate or redesign your home, you can still incorporate feng shui principles into your space.

How to get started: There are many aspects to feng shui, and one of the most important rules is called the “command position." The “command position” is the feng shui concept that governs where and how you can position your furniture in a given space to achieve the best and positive flow of energy. Ideally your bed, desk, and stove should be positioned so that you can see the door, while not in line with the door. Better yet, is to have your back against the wall furthest from the door, so you can see the expanse of the room, but not in directly in line with the door. This places you in command of the room, your home and your life, so that you can see what the universe brings to you and you are not in a position to be surprised. The “command position” situates you in so that you can clearly see ahead and move forward with your eyes open...

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by Anjie Cho


Celebrate Earth Day with Feng Shui!

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image credit: Shutterstock via inhabitat.com

image credit: Shutterstock via inhabitat.com

In light of the forthcoming Earth Day and Earth Week, I wanted to share what “Earth” means in the Feng Shui world. When people ask me to describe feng shui, I tell them that it’s about much more than moving furniture around. Feng shui is the original “green design,” and it is about creating harmony with Mother Earth by unifying our inner and outer environments. The inner and outer are not separate, because everything that we do to our earth – positive and negative – affects our daily experience. In feng shui we believe that everything is alive, including the earth. 

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by Anjie Cho


5 Ways To Kick Off Your Green Spring Cleaning With Feng Shui Principles

featured today on inhabitat.com

Photo credit: Shutterstock via inhabitat.com

Photo credit: Shutterstock via inhabitat.com

HAPPY FIRST DAY OF SPRING! I don’t know about you, but I’m ready for winter to come to an end. Adios thermal underwear, hello shorts! Happily, the spring equinox occurs on March 20th this year, which is today! The equinox marks the two times each year at which day and night are equally balanced. In Feng Shui philosophy, the vernal equinox indicates the moment at which the excess of dark, cold, passive yin energy shifts into balance with the bright, hot, active yang energy. We move away from the extended hours of darkness and move into the longer daylight hours. Most importantly, it symbolizes a time for a new cycle of growth and expansion. We spent the last few months hibernating in winter, and now is the time when the energy of spring sprouts and pushes through the dormant earth. Feng Shui principles encourage us to peek into those dark closets, open up all the windows, and really start shifting the energy in our spaces. In Feng Shui, we seek to release stale stuck energy and welcome in new vibrant life energy. Appropriately enough, according to the Chinese Almanac, this year’s spring equinox falls on a day that’s not much good for anything but substantial cleaning and repairs to your home or workspace. So what better way to observe the vernal equinox than to start some eco-spring cleaning with the help of a little Feng Shui?...

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by Anjie Cho