Q&A Sunday: Decluttering with Feng Shui

Decluttering with Feng Shui.jpg

Can you explain/describe the Remove/Move 27 items in your home method? I have read different ideas like discard 9 items a day for 27 days, 27 items for 27 days etc. I am cluttered and need to clean! I was hoping for your insight.

Maria S., Yonkers, NY

Hi Maria, thank you so much for your question!

The adjustment to remove or move a particular number of items for a specific number of days comes from the idea that by moving or removing items, you can stir up the qi or energy in your home. If there is no movement, the energy of your space as well as your inner and outer lives may be stagnant and/or stuck. Since you mentioned you have clutter that needs improving, this does sound like a good adjustment for you.

As for the numbers, BTB feng shui philosophy places much luck and auspiciousness to the number 9, and multiples of 9 such as 18 or 27. My intuition tells me that you would benefit from discarding 9 items a day for 27 days. See how that feels, wait 3 days and start again! The numbers are not arbitrary and I usually prescribe the numbers based on the particular client. You can’t go wrong if you discard 27 for 27 days, or discard 9 for 9 days, or even 9 for 81 days. My teachers have taught me that the more challenging the effort, the greater the results while finding balance in what is actually the effort level that you’re ready to exert. 

Finally, remember clutter isn’t always negative. Read my article here.

by Anjie Cho


Mindful Design is a new way to learn feng shui. Our a unique training program takes an holistic approach to learning the art of feng shui design. Mindful design is about becoming aware, and attentive, to the energy around you: both inner and outer qi. It is about promoting a better way of living and creating sacred spaces that support, and nourish. Visit us at mindfuldesignschool.com


Thanks for reading our "Q&A Sunday".  We will be answering questions submitted by our readers. Click here to submit any Feng Shui or Green Design questions!

Small Bedroom Ideas: The Best Ways to Maximize Your Tiny Space

featured on wirecutter by Caroline Biggs

image credit: Rozette Rago via    wirecutter

image credit: Rozette Rago via wirecutter

Small bedrooms pose big challenges, particularly if you’re short on closets or if you need to fit in a home office. That’s why we asked five design and organizing experts for advice on getting the most out of a tiny bedroom, then tested decor in a 275-square-foot New York City apartment. Whether you want a storage bed, a compact nightstand, or a room divider, the 19 items we recommend should help maximize your small space.

Why you should trust me

I’ve been writing about small-space design for over seven years, for publications including The New York Times (now the parent company of Wirecutter), Refinery 29, Apartment Therapy, Architectural Digest, and Domino. For this guide, I researched hundreds of bedroom furnishings sold through Amazon, Bed Bath & Beyond, The Container Store, IKEA, Target, and other retailers. I tested more than a dozen items in my own 250-square-foot apartment and I evaluated other products in person at IKEA and West Elm.

I also spoke with five home-organizing experts to get their insights on designing a small bedroom: Emily Henderson, interior designer and blogger behind Style by Emily Henderson; Clea Shearer and Joanna Teplin, professional organizers at The Home Edit and authors of The Home Edit: A Guide to Organizing and Realizing Your House Goals; Tali Roth, interior designer at Homepolish; Anjie Cho, interior architect, holistic designer, and feng shui educator; and Nicole Anzia, professional organizer and founder of Neatnik.

How to organize a small bedroom

Before you decide what to buy, consider the types of items that work best in a small bedroom. Our experts recommended thinking about these four general guidelines to help maximize every inch.

…read full article


If you’d like to learn more about feng shui check out the Mindful Design Feng Shui certification program. Laura Morris and I launched our program in September 2018. To get on the list about it, sign up at: www.mindfuldesignschool.com.

Mindful Design is a new way to learn feng shui. Our unique training program takes an holistic approach to learning the art of feng shui design. Mindful design is about becoming aware, and attentive, to the energy around you: both inner and outer qi. It is about promoting a better way of living and creating sacred spaces that support, and nourish.


Clear Out the Clutter

featured in Natural Health

I’m thrilled to be featured in the recent October issue of Natural Health Magazine. Pick up a copy to read the full “Clear Out the Clutter” post, and check out some of our blog posts on clearing clutter as well!

by Anjie Cho


If you’d like to learn more about feng shui check out the Mindful Design Feng Shui certification program. Laura Morris and I launched our program in September 2018. To get on the list about it, sign up at: www.mindfuldesignschool.com.

Mindful Design is a new way to learn feng shui. Our unique training program takes an holistic approach to learning the art of feng shui design. Mindful design is about becoming aware, and attentive, to the energy around you: both inner and outer qi. It is about promoting a better way of living and creating sacred spaces that support, and nourish.


How to Spring Clean & Green your Beauty Cabinet with Anjie Cho

featured this month on Modern Minerals by Mo Mi

image credit: Lotus Wei

image credit: Lotus Wei

In the late summer of 2015, I was in Brookfield Place in lower Manhattan where I found a book titled “108 Ways to Create Holistic Spaces“. I was in a bit of a rush, but snapped a photo of this because I knew this was something I needed to read. At the time I was with my Mom and said “I would love to meet this designer one day”. A year later, my friend Katie Hess invited me to a super moon soirée on the roof top of building in Flatiron. I sat down next to Anjie and we started talking and I immediately knew we were going to be friends. It wasn’t until in 2017 that I had finally got around to organizing my photos when I found this photo I had taken in 2015 to remind me I wanted to read this book, and to my surprise the author was my incredible friend Anjie Cho! Since getting to know Anjie and watching her on YouTube, I often turn to Anjie when I’m feeling like something could be made better or for practical solutions to improve the flow of energy and balance in my space. Learn more from her podcasts HERE.

I wanted to find out more about Anjie for some advice on how to Spring Clean our beauty cabinets and asked her for some advice…Check it out!

...read full article


Buried in Paperwork

featured this month in The New York Times by Ronda Kaysen

image credit: Trisha Krauss via  The New York Times

image credit: Trisha Krauss via The New York Times

The little round dining table in LaToya and Robert Jordan’s Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, two-bedroom apartment would make for a great place to eat if only its white lacquered top were not perpetually buried under a pile of bills, unopened mail and paperwork.

“It really becomes clutter, and it becomes this area in your home that tends to hold a lot of guilt,” said Anjie Cho, an architect and feng shui consultant. “It’s an energy drain, even just sitting there, because your subconscious mind knows that it’s there.”

...read full article