Finding the Right Place for a Home Office

image credit: Trisha Krauss via  New York Times

image credit: Trisha Krauss via New York Times

When working from home, where you work is often an afterthought. But it shouldn’t be.

Earlier this year, I faced a conundrum that many of us who work from home know well: Where in the house can I actually work?

Unless you’re blessed with a home large enough for a dedicated office, or are a truly nomadic worker and able to set up shop on a sofa with nothing more than a cup of tea and your laptop, you’re inevitably going to have to carve out space in a room that isn’t naturally intended for work.

Any spot you choose has the potential to diminish what you had before. Set up camp in your bedroom, and you’re left staring down your desk when you’re trying to get to sleep, all those unanswered emails calling to you as you lie awake at 4 a.m. Move to the kitchen or dining room, and snack time becomes an endless loop. (Why work when you could sample that fresh salsa from the farmers market?) Steal a corner of the living room, and suddenly your prime social area feels like some weird break room outside an office cubicle.

These were my options when I relinquished my airy bedroom office to my son when he outgrew the room he had long shared with his sister. I knew this day would come, and yet, when it did, I still didn’t have a good answer for where to go.

So I went to the place where all objects with no obvious home inevitably end up: the basement.

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If you’d like to learn more about feng shui check out the Mindful Design Feng Shui certification program. Laura Morris and I launched our program in September 2018. To get on the list about it, sign up at: www.mindfuldesignschool.com.

Dive deeper into feng shui to transform your life!

Mindful Design is a new way to learn feng shui. Create sacred spaces that support, and nourish.

Visit us at mindfuldesignschool.com

How to Create Good Feng Shui in Your Home

featured on The Spruce

image credit: Oscar Wong/Getty Images via  The Spruce

image credit: Oscar Wong/Getty Images via The Spruce

Creating Good Feng Shui

It can be overwhelming trying to figure out where to start when it comes to cultivating good feng shui in your home. What rooms should you begin with? How do you start fresh or what do you do if a room is already decorated? Thankfully, it doesn't need to be challenging. We've compiled a few ideas that will kickstart your journey to a happier and healthier home. So whether you’re new to feng shui or an expert, here are nine essential steps to create good feng shui in your home.

Brighten Up Your Entry

In feng shui, your entry represents how energy enters your home and your life. We say the front door is the “mouth of qi.” Naturally, the entry is first place to start when you want to create good feng shui in your home.

Start with decluttering and removing any debris. A lot of objects tend to accumulate at the front door. I'm not saying it needs to be completely empty, but rather uncluttered. Make it work for you.

Next, sweep and clean up the area. The front entry (interior and exterior) is often overlooked. Wipe down the door and shake out the door mat. Take a good look around.

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by Anjie Cho


If you’d like to learn more about feng shui check out the Mindful Design Feng Shui certification program. Laura Morris and I launched our program in September 2018. To get on the list about it, sign up at: www.mindfuldesignschool.com.

Dive deeper into feng shui to transform your life!

Mindful Design is a new way to learn feng shui. Create sacred spaces that support, and nourish.

Visit us at mindfuldesignschool.com

Q&A Sunday: Schools of Feng Shui

Schools of Feng Shui - Blue.jpg

There are so many schools of feng shui, I'm honestly a little confused. I just recently just found out that when sleeping, it is the crown of our head that faces our favourable direction. My mother had a seasoned practitioner come over a long time ago (almost 15 years ago, I think) and he told us the complete opposite! So technically we've been facing the wrong direction for almost 15 years! 

Samantha C., Malaysia

Thanks Samantha for this follow up comment. I believe that this is a great topic for Q&A Sunday!

Yes, there are dozens of feng shui schools out there, and not only is it confusing, they may contradict each other! The compass school looks at directions, the form school looks at shapes, plus there’s flying stars and many more. I practice BTB feng shui.

In BTB feng shui, we recognize all other schools of feng shui as correct and valid. One major difference with BTB is that we look at the direction of qi into a space, so the bagua is located based on the flow of energy. We also utilize many “invisible” cures in addition to mundane enhancements such as adding a crystal or moving furniture. The invisible cures are sometimes found in BTB books, but most often only shared by practitioners. Invisible cures may be rituals, meditations, etc. – which are effective ways to further boost your physical adjustments with powerful intention. An example would be “One good deed a day.” Personally, I share the “transcendental” adjustments one-on-one only.

In regards to your sleeping direction, I would encourage you to consider, rather than feeling that you have been facing the “wrong” direction, we can shift that viewpoint. Maybe this change of direction in bed symbolizes a shift in your life. Perhaps you are embracing another way of positioning yourself in the world and you’re excited to see the qi that’s opening up in your life.

It's interesting, because I’ve been reading a little into Vastu (Vedic feng shui), and they also use the commanding position for the bed. Yes, the different feng shui schools may contradict each other and be very confusing. In feng shui implementation, I suggest you use an advanced practitioner or do your best to follow one school.

by Anjie Cho


Mindful Design is a new way to learn feng shui. Our a unique training program takes an holistic approach to learning the art of feng shui design. Mindful design is about becoming aware, and attentive, to the energy around you: both inner and outer qi. It is about promoting a better way of living and creating sacred spaces that support, and nourish. Visit us at mindfuldesignschool.com.


Thanks for reading our "Q&A Sunday".  We will be answering questions submitted by our readers. Click here to submit any Feng Shui or Green Design questions!

Q&A Sunday: Feng Shui in a Small Home

I am living in a very small house with a combination of toilet and shower (too small) on the ground floor. We have the intention to create a proper bathroom (no toilet) on the first floor, but the only room where that's possible is in the wealth & prosperity area of the bagua. As far as I know, this is not the best place because of the downward flow of energy. At the same time, we want to make an extension to create workspace, but this is only possible in front of the front door line. I have a lot of doubts and even consider whether it is better to move.

Corina van T., Holland

Hello to Holland! 

Thank you for your email, and thanks for reading my newsletter!

For clarification, in your small house, you currently have a small bathroom with toilet and shower only on the ground floor. You would like to create a bathroom on the upper floor with a bathtub and sink, but no toilet. However you are concerned because this area is in the wealth/abundance area of your home.

I have a couple of thoughts and comments. First, laying the bagua on upper floors is sometimes challenging. You would determine the layout based on what direction you are facing and where you are located as you make your final step onto the floor in question. So, I would ask you to double check the bagua layout. It’s a little challenging and usually something that an advanced feng shui practioner should advise you on. But if the bathroom must be in the abundance area, or you’re not able to layout the bagua confidently, it is what it is! I suggest balancing the energy with plants. The thought with bathrooms is that there is a lot of water flowing out, which symbolizes loss of cash flow and wealth. By adding plants, you can use this downward qi flow and feed the plants so there’s an upward positive growth.

Your second question is in regards to a work space or office in front of the front door (or “kan line”), which places it outside of the bagua. My teachers have taught that an extension of workspace in front of the kan line (front door line) is fine. In fact, it might be beneficial in two ways. First, you are extending the “gua,” whether the gua is Knowledge, Path in Life/Career, or Benefactors/Helpful people. The extension improves and expands your work in light of the gua it’s in. Second, the office outside the front door can mean you’re out in the world more, and can receive support in this way for your career.

Finally, whether to move or not, well that's up to you. I don’t know exactly how challenging it is there, functionally and feng shui wise, but in BTB feng shui we try to make suggestions so you don't have to move, which can be difficult and disruptive. However, if moving seems like the best positive thing for you, it should be considered. My intuition tells me that the issues that you asked about are able to be worked with :)

by Anjie Cho


Mindful Design is a new way to learn feng shui. Our a unique training program takes an holistic approach to learning the art of feng shui design. Mindful design is about becoming aware, and attentive, to the energy around you: both inner and outer qi. It is about promoting a better way of living and creating sacred spaces that support, and nourish. Visit us at mindfuldesignschool.com.


Thanks for reading our "Q&A Sunday".  We will be answering questions submitted by our readers. Click here to submit any Feng Shui or Green Design questions!

Q&A Sunday: Decluttering with Feng Shui

Decluttering with Feng Shui.jpg

Can you explain/describe the Remove/Move 27 items in your home method? I have read different ideas like discard 9 items a day for 27 days, 27 items for 27 days etc. I am cluttered and need to clean! I was hoping for your insight.

Maria S., Yonkers, NY

Hi Maria, thank you so much for your question!

The adjustment to remove or move a particular number of items for a specific number of days comes from the idea that by moving or removing items, you can stir up the qi or energy in your home. If there is no movement, the energy of your space as well as your inner and outer lives may be stagnant and/or stuck. Since you mentioned you have clutter that needs improving, this does sound like a good adjustment for you.

As for the numbers, BTB feng shui philosophy places much luck and auspiciousness to the number 9, and multiples of 9 such as 18 or 27. My intuition tells me that you would benefit from discarding 9 items a day for 27 days. See how that feels, wait 3 days and start again! The numbers are not arbitrary and I usually prescribe the numbers based on the particular client. You can’t go wrong if you discard 27 for 27 days, or discard 9 for 9 days, or even 9 for 81 days. My teachers have taught me that the more challenging the effort, the greater the results while finding balance in what is actually the effort level that you’re ready to exert. 

Finally, remember clutter isn’t always negative. Read my article here.

by Anjie Cho


Mindful Design is a new way to learn feng shui. Our a unique training program takes an holistic approach to learning the art of feng shui design. Mindful design is about becoming aware, and attentive, to the energy around you: both inner and outer qi. It is about promoting a better way of living and creating sacred spaces that support, and nourish. Visit us at mindfuldesignschool.com


Thanks for reading our "Q&A Sunday".  We will be answering questions submitted by our readers. Click here to submit any Feng Shui or Green Design questions!