It's Nesting Season — Here's How To Make Your Bed The Coziest On The Planet

image credit: Megan Doty, mbg Creative via    MindBodyGreen

image credit: Megan Doty, mbg Creative via MindBodyGreen

The term "hygge" first popped up on the American scene in 2016, and unlike other home trends come and gone, the Danish philosophy that prizes cozy, comfortable spaces has withstood the test of time.

It makes sense: Who wouldn't want to walk in their front door and immediately feel wrapped in a warm hug? Typical hyggelig fodder includes fuzzy socks and roaring candles, but to ring in winter 2019 we're calling for the next iteration of a wellness-approved hygge bedroom: one that makes us feel cushy and safe while also promoting a better night's sleep.

Go forth and make the bed of your dreams with these eight add-ons:

6. Reminders of people (or pets!) you love.

Placing a reminder of someone or something you love right across from your bed basically guarantees that you wake up in a good mood every morning. It can be a photograph from a family trip, a dreamy landscape, or an ode to a furry friend.

When you're hanging yours, take a cue from feng shui design philosophy and place it a little higher on the wall than you think you need to. "If someone has issues with depression and low energy, I often notice that their artwork, photographs, and mirrors are hung low on the walls. The low artwork can bring down your chi," feng shui expert Anjie Cho explained in a piece about bedroom design. "It's also good to fasten frames in two places so the art isn't crooked."

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If you’d like to learn more about feng shui check out the Mindful Design Feng Shui certification program. Laura Morris and I launched our program in September 2018. To get on the list about it, sign up at: www.mindfuldesignschool.com.

Mindful Design is a new way to learn feng shui. Our unique training program takes an holistic approach to learning the art of feng shui design. Mindful design is about becoming aware, and attentive, to the energy around you: both inner and outer qi. It is about promoting a better way of living and creating sacred spaces that support, and nourish.


Q&A Sunday: Feng Shui and Mindfulness in Art

I wanted to send a picture that I have hanging in my bedroom to get your opinion of the Feng Shui as you suggested in one of your posts. The  online form did not allow me to input it. I hope this is ok! Thanks!

Lucretia B., Austin, TX

Hi Lucretia,

Thanks for your email and for sending in your question. This is a lovely piece of art. May I assume that it’s one that you care for, since you’ve not only hung it in your bedroom, but you’ve also taken the time to ask me about it? Take a moment to touch into how you feel about this artwork. Where did it come from? What do you sense from it? How does it feel in your body when you gaze upon it?

It still surprises me that sometimes I receive questions about feng shui and art where the asker has a neutral position on the piece. Sometimes they can take it or leave it. I think we have the tendency to try to fill up space and just put something up ‘just because’. Often they have no idea why they wanted to put it up in the first place, besides that there was a empty space they wanted filled.

Sound familiar? We do the same with food, television, any sort of entertainment so we don’t feel the empty, bored, sad...etc. It’s not ‘bad’; however it’s interesting to notice this and see that if it comes from mindless conditioning. Is this coming from a helpful place? This is true mindfulness, contemplation and paying attention to the details even for a few moments.

I also encourage my clients to wait for the art that they love. You don’t need to rush and hurry to finish up your home. In fact, it’s kind of fun to have your eye open for something that you love. Alternatively you can find something to put up that’s not perfect but is trendy and fun for now, without a lot of investment. Or...why not just keep the space open?!

There is, of course, also the aspect of the location of this art. In your case, this art is up in your bedroom. If you’re a single woman ready and actively desiring a relationship with a partner, this isn’t exactly the best imagery. But the colors are soothing; the cool hues are okay for a bedroom otherwise. The angles are rather metal-like, so precise and orthogonal. And it can certainly go in another area of your home.

Be sure to check out our other posts about art!

by Anjie Cho


If you’d like to learn more about feng shui check out the Mindful Design feng shui cerfication program. Laura Morris and I launched our program in September 2018. Check us out at www.mindfuldesignschool.com

Mindful Design is a new way to learn feng shui. Our a unique training program takes an holistic approach to learning the art of feng shui design. Mindful design is about becoming aware, and attentive, to the energy around you: both inner and outer qi. It is about promoting a better way of living and creating sacred spaces that support, and nourish.


Thanks for reading our "Q&A Sunday".  We will be answering questions submitted by our readers. Click here to submit any Feng Shui or Green Design questions!


Q&A Sunday: What is the Best Art for the Bedroom?

What is the Best Art for the Bedroom?.jpg

What is the best art to hang in the bedroom?

Magalie R., Los Angeles, CA

Hi Magalie,

Thanks for your question! I remember when you asked if it was good feng shui to have a painting of water in the bedroom. This one seems to be a follow up, as you're wondering what is the best art to hang in the bedroom

There are many times that I go into a single person’s bedroom and see art of single people, or the person's pet. While this is totally fine, usually the single person is looking to meet a partner. In feng shui we would say that by having images of single people you are giving the universe the message that you want to be alone. Now sometimes I see a lot of photos of the pet(s) as well. This may indicate that the single person has no room for a partner as the pet has filled up that spot.

If you want a partner (or already have one), feng shui encourages you to have things in pairs. So images in pairs whether it be people, or two things that are similar but not necessarily identical, give the universe the message that you’re ready to have a partnership that’s balanced and equal with another person. I'm not just talking about image of couples, but perhaps two similar pieces of art in similar frames.

In addition, the bedroom is a place of rest and relaxation. Any artwork that is tranquil and nurturing in color and subject matter is ideal, especially if you have trouble sleeping. Pale, muted or dark blues, greens, pinks and purples in art can create a restful mood in a bedroom. If you want to bring in a little more spice and passion, add red artwork to bring in some fire energy.

If there is a particular piece of art you are looking to add to your bedroom, please feel free to submit it for the next Q&A Sunday!

by Anjie Cho


Thanks for reading our "Q&A Sunday" (formerly “Question of the Month”).  We will be answering questions submitted by our readers.  Click here to submit any Feng Shui or Green Design questions!


Q&A Sunday: Artwork in Pairs

I have purchased the Venus mandala, and I want to hang it my bedroom, but just ran across a post on decorating a couple’s room, and it says to hang artwork in pairs. Do I need to get another mandala, or is this ok, since it symbolizes relationships?

Shayna G., New York, NY

Hi Shayna,

Thanks for your question! I’m so glad you got the Venus mandala. I really love that one. The Venus yantra was the first yantra I ever created; it’s so delicate and pretty. And yes, the Venus mandala relates to romance and emotions, which would be a wonderful addition to your bedroom.

Now onto your question! It is ideal to have things in pairs in the bedroom, such as pairs of pillows, or two nightstands, but it’s not a strict rule. For instance, it makes a lot of sense to have a pair of pillows and two nightstands because there’s something for you and something for your partner. But for instance, artwork of a single woman may not be the best thing for a woman who’s lonely and looking for a partner. In one case, I visited the home of a woman with several images of singular things. It was very obvious. But it’s perfectly okay to have things not in pairs, such as your Venus mandala, especially because the purpose of that mandala is to support your relationship. In fact, I have that first yantra I ever painted hanging in my bedroom, and it’s not in a pair. 

Most principles in feng shui are highly personal, and this one is no different. If there is a beautiful piece of art that you want for your bedroom and really love it, it's most likely acceptable. In this case especially, as the art represents relationships. If you find that the artwork in your room is singular and much of it has to do with being alone or isolated, then you may want to take a look at what that reflects for your life. 

by Anjie Cho


Thanks for reading our "Q&A Sunday".  We will be answering questions submitted by our readers. Click here to submit any Feng Shui or Green Design questions!


Amy T. Won: Behind the Art

Photo credit: Amy T. Won

Photo credit: Amy T. Won

AC: Please tell us about your art!

AT: I'm in love with our natural world, and I believe that if we take the time to explore it and look hard enough, there's much amazement and magic to be found. My hope is to create art that are like enchanting windows to the small and big adventures in life.

Photo credit: Amy T. Won

Photo credit: Amy T. Won

I'm currently working on an Explorations series of work, which straddles the line between the real and imagined, between abstract and representational. The current collection is called Journey Through The Seven Seas and is inspired by my own physical and perceived watery adventures. The pieces range from small watercolors on handmade paper framed in shadow boxes to larger acrylics on canvases.

(Display from 'Explorations Part 1: Journey Through the Seven Seas', Amy's traveling art show featuring paintings on handmade paper in vintage and found frames which will be at Artists & Fleas LA Feb 21st and 22nd.  )

(Display from 'Explorations Part 1: Journey Through the Seven Seas', Amy's traveling art show featuring paintings on handmade paper in vintage and found frames which will be at Artists & Fleas LA Feb 21st and 22nd.  )

("Moonrise over Seven Seas", Watercolor, acrylic and casein on handmade paper. )

("Moonrise over Seven Seas", Watercolor, acrylic and casein on handmade paper. )

I just started the second part of Explorations, entitled "Getting Lost" which are larger pieces about plunging into the unknown, getting lost in a world of wonder and the unmapping and unknowing of our inner and outer selves. I'm really excited about this body of work and while I can't show you much, here are a few teasers:

Photo credit: Amy T. Won

Photo credit: Amy T. Won

How do you think art can set the tone for a space or home?

Art is the quickest way to personalize and create character within a space since it can reveal much about the home owners' tastes and what they are drawn to and like to surround themselves with. Choosing the right art, in the right size, can really strengthen an existing room theme and take it to another level of interest and intrigue. It's also one of the most effective ways to set the stage for a desired mood or atmosphere depending on the size and subject, color, texture, medium and choice of display or framing.

Photo credit: Amy T. Won

Photo credit: Amy T. Won

Large pieces of art that take up a significant portion of the wall are like windows into another world or clear statements of style. Smaller pieces of art grouped together in the popular gallery style can show taste range, layer and cultural depth, allowing the home owner to curate a selection of images and objects that tell a story or create a certain mood.

Photo credit:  Lonny/Patrick Cline

Photo credit: Lonny/Patrick Cline

Photo credit:  William Waldron

Photo credit: William Waldron

What do you think people should look for when purchasing art for their home?

I always think that people should prioritize choosing art that resonates with them rather than just because it suits the color scheme and texture of the space. While the latter is important, selecting art that first means something to you adds a special layer of your own character and personality to your space, making it more interesting and joyful to inhabit. 

Photo credit: Jim Darling

Photo credit: Jim Darling

Think of art as the little reminders of qualities you like to surround yourself with-do you like to come home to cheerful joyous color because you're stuck in a drab cubicle all day? Abstracts in your favorite colors that lift the spirit might be your thing. Do you live in the city and yearn for a window into an enchanted forest as a mini reprieve to your daily life? Then perhaps an oversized painted woods scene or landscape tapestry to adorn the walls. Do you love the whimsy and carefree spirit of childhood and hope to infuse more of that into your life? Choosing naive-style art by your favorite artists would be a wonderful reminder to stay young at heart always.

When choosing art, the most important part is to consider the size of the wall it's going on and what furniture and objects will form the 'vignette' around it. It's always helpful to think of the art wall as a 'story' -what is it saying? How do you want it to feel? What is the mood you are trying to create? Make sure the art is proportional to the wall it's on, breaking rules of scale only if you are confident in the resulting drama.

Photo credit: Mike Kelley

Photo credit: Mike Kelley

Consider color and texture, though it's not necessary to match the art to the furniture and furnishings unless you're trying to design to a particular mood or theme. Consider whether it is framed in glass (usually heavier) and make sure that this would work in your space. Think of different types of art, not just painted ones-try tapestry, area rugs, flat sculptures, maps, masks, vintage book pages and so forth.

Photo credit:  Jan Baldwin

Photo credit: Jan Baldwin

What do you suggest people should look for when purchasing original art?

Price is one of the first things people think about when purchasing original art, after deciding if they are drawn to it. There are many artists who offer emerging collector prices on some of their art for those attracted to original art but unsure if they can afford the high prices. These can be studies or experiments that are not in gallery-ready, finished quality. Pieces like these can be a charming addition to your collection, beautiful in the honesty of their imperfection and transparency of process.

Make sure to ask if the art is created on archival materials and what the suggested care for it is. Original watercolors framed in glass should be displayed away from sunlight and moisture. Are the oils or acrylics varnished? Is there a warranty for damaged frames? 

Is the piece signed by the artist? Does it come with a Certificate of Authenticity? Some folks like the extra touch of receiving one as assurance that the piece is what it claims to be.

Shopping for original art is a fun process, let your heart guide you and if an artist's work resonates with you, make sure to stay in touch, their future pieces might appeal as well.

by Anjie Cho


Amy T. Won is the artist, storyteller and enchantment-seeker behind The TreeSpace Studio, where she shares her explorations and painted mementos of our wonder-filled world. You can also find her adventures on Instagram (amytwon) and Facebook (The TreeSpace Studio) or take a peek into her inspirations on Pinterest (Amy Won).